Who will bid $1 for this Manhattan home? – Crain’s New York Business

Who will bid $1 for this Manhattan home? – Crain’s New York Business

Posted using ShareThis

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Who will bid $1 for this Manhattan home? – Crain’s New York Business

  1. Sorry, that should have read “Last I checked, I went to the store on my own volition and will *to* buy Lotto” and “No evil Lottery official dragged me to the store *to* get a ticket against my own will.”

  2. I buy lottery, am an ethnic minority, and have never thought of Lottery as “preying on ethnic communities.” Last I checked, I went to the store on my own volition and will buy Lotto. No evil Lottery official dragged me to the store get a ticket against my own will.

    And I know a lot of white people who buy Lotto too. I guess we’re all just victims–except for those who win, of course (remember the recent dude who hit the jackpot from Harlem? He was an “ethnic minority” too–I’m sure he didn’t mind being “preyed” on!).

  3. Horrible event. This fosters a false illusion, a false perception, as if you can buy these properties for $1, or $100,000, when in truth and fact you cannot. The disclaimer “sellers must approve any sale” says this is a “no lose” for the seller….if they don’t like the price, no deal. Hence the seller can only win, the bidder can only lose (and pay more than what the market was willing to). The seller IS NOT going to sell the property of ONE dollar less than what they think they can get in the open market, than they’ve been trying to get.

    What’s horrible about this is very similar to how it’s horrible for the Lottery to prey upon ethnic communities, those least able to afford to gamble. And ethnic communities, especially Black people, disproportionately buy lottery tickets. Lotteries lure, sell, promote fantasy for 99.9999% of those spending their money on them.

    I am sick and tired of seeing exploitation. I don’t care if it’s the lottery, or some scheme, a marketing gimmick selling illusion. A real and fair “auction” this is not! This is marketing to the gullible, as is most lottery advertising and marketing. If these properties can’t sell, lower the damn price to meet demand. That the sellers WILL NOT DO. What will they do? Resort to gimmicks like this, a continual effort to fleece, the find a greater fool to buy overpriced property that the market itself has no interest in at the sellers desired price.

Comments are closed.